People

Officers

Laurie Feldman

U Albany and Haskins Laboratories

Laurie Feldman is Professor of Psychology at The University at Albany, State University of New York and Senior Scientist at Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, CT. Her research focuses on how speakers of a language understand and produce words composed of several meaningful components (morphemes). It spans native language processing of several languages with very different structures (viz., HEBREW, SERBIAN, CHINESE as well as ENGLISH) and mastery of past tense inflectional morphology in English among speakers and readers with non-native as well as native proficiency. Much of the work is conducted abroad and has been supported by fellowships from NAS and from NSF/WISC (AAAS). She has a history of support from NICHD to Haskins Laboratories. She edited a volume entitled Morphological Aspects of Language Processing. She serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition and Mental Lexicon. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. She worked on the salary task force at The University at Albany.

Judith Kroll

University of California, Riverside

Judith Kroll is Distinguished Professor of Psychology, at University of California, Riverside. Together with Annette de Groot, she co-edited Tutorials in Bilingualism: Psycholinguistic Perspectives (1997, Erlbaum) and the Handbook of Bilingualism: Psycholinguistic Approaches (2005, Oxford). She served as a co-editor of Bilingualism: Language and Cognition from its founding in 1997 until 2001 and its coordinating editor from 2001-2002. She serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Memory and Language, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, International Journal of Bilingualism, and Psychological Science, and on the governing board of the Psychonomic Society. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and of Division 3 of the American Psychological Association. The research that she and her students conduct concerns the acquisition, comprehension, and production of two languages during second language learning and in proficient bilingual performance. Their work, using behavioral and neurocognitive methods, is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.

Suparna Rajaram

Stony Brook University

Suparna Rajaram is Professor of Psychology at Stony Brook University. Rajaram is a cognitive psychologist who studies memory, including the interpersonal transmission of memory through social groups and networks and the emergence of collective memory. Her work has included research with both people affected by amnesia and people with normal memory in order to study the distinction between explicit and implicit memory, emotion and memory, learning and education, and the relationship between attention and long-term memory. Rajaram is a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (SEP), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Association for Psychological Science APS), Psychonomic Society (PS) and American Psychological Association (APA). She has served as a member of the Board of Directors of APS (2012-2015), as Chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society (2008), and as an elected member of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society (2004-2009). She has also served as Associate Editor of Psychological Science (2007-2008), Psychological Bulletin (2003-2005), and Memory & Cognition (1998-2001). Rajaram’s research and professional activities have been supported by the National Institutes of Mental Health, the National Science Foundation, Google, and the Russell Sage Foundation.

Debra Titone

McGill University

Debra Titone is Professor of Psychology at McGill University. Her research investigates the cognitive and neural underpinnings of language, with particular emphases on reading, bilingualism, formulaic or figurative language, and special populations for whom these aspects of language are challenging (e.g., healthy older adults; people with schizophrenia, dyslexia). Titone’s research has been continuously funded since 2000, first in the U.S. and now in Canada, where she held a federally supported junior Canada Research Chair for the award’s maximum duration (2003 - 2013). She is an active member of the Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music at McGill, serves on the Editoral Board of the Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, and is Associate Editor for the journal, Linguistic Approaches to Bilingualism.

Natasha Tokowicz

University of Pittsburgh

Natasha Tokowicz is Associate Professor of Psychology and Linguistics and Research Scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on adult second language learning and bilingualism. She is also interested in the role of individual differences in language processing. She is currently on the editorial boards of Bilingualism: Language and Cognition and the Journal of Cognitive Psychology.

Janet Van Hell

Pennsylvania State University

Janet van Hell received her Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam in 1998. She is currently Professor of Psychology and Linguistics, Director of the Linguistics Program, and Associate Director of the Center for Language Science at the Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on second language learning and bilingualism as well as later language development in children with typical or atypical language development. Her research has an interdisciplinary orientation as she combines behavioral, neuropsychological, and linguistic techniques to study language development and language processing. Her research is supported by grants from, amongst others, the Dutch National Science Foundation, the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture, and Science, and research institutes within the Radboud University Nijmegen. In 2005 Janet van Hell was appointed as a member, and in 2007 elected as a board member, of De Jonge Akademie (the Young Academy) of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Janet van Hell is also board member of the Dutch Psychonomic Society. She co-organizes Women in Cognitive Science meetings at Psychonomics, and the bi-annual European Conference of Cognitive Psychology (2003-now). Janet is currently Editor of the Journal of Cognitive Psychology.

Advisory Board

Teresa Bajo

Granada, Spain

Teresa Bajo is a professor of Psychology in the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Granada in Spain. Her research is supported by grants from Spanish Ministry of Science and by the Andalucian Excellence in Science Program. She has served on the Executive committee of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology, becoming President in 2005. Her research interest is on understanding complex skills such as translation and interpreting, and on how working memory and executive functions supports several aspects of these skills. She is also interested in inhibition in the control of memory and in language selection. She has also pursuit research on individual differences in memory control in both individual that differ in age and in individuals with altered memory functions.

Randall Engle

Georgia Institute of Technology

Randall W. Engle, went to W. Va. State College because it was the only school he could afford to attend but it was one of the transforming experiences of his life. State was a public all-black college prior to 1954. As a consequence, most of his faculty were outstanding scholars who could not get jobs at top universities. One of his psychology professors was a marvelously well-read scholar named Herman G. Canady, a 1929 Ph.D. from Northwestern and one of the first black ABEP’s. He worked his way through graduate school as a butler. Engle had a Harvard graduate for his math courses, a Yale Ph.D. as a drama teacher, and his French teacher was a black female who received her Ph.D. from the Sorbonne. These were impressive people to a hillbilly kid with no idea why you would ever have 2 forks beside your plate. He graduated with nearly as many hours in zoology and math as he had in psychology so it was probably inevitable that he gravitate to experimental psychology. He was admitted to Ohio State to work with D.D. Wickens. Wick was a wonderful mentor and was exceedingly patient with a student that wanted to do everything but did not focus on anything long enough to do it well. The job market was tough in 1972 and Engle was lucky to land a job at King College in Tennessee. His two years there, with 10 classes per year, made him a teacher. Fortunately, two of his classes each year were senior research seminars and he used them to conduct experiments. He was limited in equipment to a tape recorder and slide projector so he did research on modality effects in short-term memory. At the end of two years, he had two publications, enough to land him a job at the University of South Carolina where he spent the next 21 years.

He moved to the School of Psychology at Georgia Institute of Technology as Chair, a position he held for 13 years. He stepped down as chair to found the GSU/GT Center for Advanced Brain Imaging on the Georgia Tech campus. He is editor of Current Directions in Psychological Science and has been on the editorial board of numerous other journals over his career. His research for the past 30 years has explored the nature of working memory and executive attention, the nature and causes of limitations in working memory capacity, the role of those differences in real-world cognitive tasks, and the association of working memory capacity and cognitive control with fluid intelligence. His work has been funded by various agencies including the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and Office of Naval Research. His work has been highly influential across a wide array of areas including social psychology, emotion, psychopathology, developmental psychology, psychological testing, and has contributed to modern theory of cognitive and emotional control. Harzing’s Publish or Perish shows that Engle’s work has been cited over 22,000 times. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, Association of Psychological Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society of Experimental Psychology, and the Memory Disorders Research Society. He has served as Chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society, Chair of the Board of the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology (COGDOP), and President of Division 3 of APA. He received the first APA Division 3 Lifetime Achievement Award.

Morton Ann Gernsbacher

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Morton Ann Gernsbacher is Vilas Research Professor and the Sir Frederic C. Bartlett Professor at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, where she studies cognitive processes and mechanisms. Gernsbacher is a fellow of SEP, APA (Divisions 1, 3, and 6), APS, AERA, and AAAS. She has served as the William James Lecturer, APA Distinguished Scientist Lecturer, President of APS, President of the International Society for Text and Discourse, President of APA’s Division of Experimental Psychology, Member-at-Large of AAAS, Chair of APA’s Board of Scientific Affairs, and member of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society. She is currently President-Elect of the Foundation for the Advancement for Behavioral and Brain Sciences. Gernsbacher is an award winning teacher, who in 1998 received the Hilldale Award for Distinguished Professional Accomplishment, the highest award bestowed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison faculty. She has served as editor of Memory & Cognition, co-editor of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, and associate editor of Cognitive Psychology.

Zenzi M. Griffin

The University of Texas at Austin

Zenzi M. Griffin is a Professor of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin. She earned a PhD in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1998. Before going to Texas, she was on the psychology faculty at Stanford University and then the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). Dr. Griffin studies the psychological processes that result in speech. She has been particularly concerned with how people select words, order phrases, and the way that they manage (and mismanage) the timing of word retrieval. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health and she has often served on panels for both organizations.

Pernille Hemmer

Rutgers University

Pernille Hemmer is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Rutgers University. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Cognitive Science at the University of California, Irvine, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychology at Syracuse University. Her research is focused on the interaction between episodic and semantic memory, as well as decision making in naturalistic environments. Pernille Hemmer is currently a board member of The Society for Mathematical Psychology and a co-organizer for Women of Mathematical Psychology.

Helene Intraub

University of Delaware

Helene Intraub is Professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Delaware.

Randi C. Martin

Rice University

Randi C. Martin is the Elma Schneider Professor of Psychology. She is editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was recently elected a member of the Society of Experimental Psychologists. Her research on short-term memory and language processing in aphasia has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 1984. Currently, her research focuses on the role of interference and retrieval from working memory during sentence production and comprehension.

Nora S. Newcombe

Temple

Nora S. Newcombe is Professor and James H. Glackin Fellow at Temple University. Her Ph.D. is from Harvard University. Her research focuses on spatial development and the development of episodic memory. Dr. Newcombe is the author of numerous chapters, articles, and books, including Making Space (with Janellen Huttenlocher). Her work has been recognized by awards including the George A. Miller Award and the G. Stanley Hall Award. She has served as Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General and Associate Editor of Psychological Bulletin. She is currently PI of the NSF-funded Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center.

Mary A. Peterson

University of Arizona

Mary A. Peterson received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1984 and is currently Professor in the Department of Psychology and Research Social Scientist in the Cognitive Science Program at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on visual cognition, in particular, on the competitive processes involved in figure and ground assignment, the role of past experience and context in perceptual organization, and the use of implicit measures to index shape learning. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society and of the American Psychological Association and a member of the Society of Experimental Psychologists. She was Associate Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance (1996-1999) and is currently on the editorial boards of that journal and Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. With Gillian Rhodes, she co-edits a book series "Advances in Visual Cognition" for Oxford University Press.

James R. Pomerantz

Rice University

James R. Pomerantz is a professor in the Department of Psychology at Rice University in Houston, Texas; Adjunct Professor of Neuroscience at Baylor College of Medicine; and Adjunct Professor of Neurobiology & Anatomy at University of Texas Houston Medical School. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1974 after taking his BA with distinction and high honors in Psychology from the University of Michigan in 1968, and after working at Bell Telephone Laboratories. After studying and teaching at Yale, he served on the faculty of psychology departments at The Johns Hopkins University, State University of New York at Buffalo, Brown University, and Rice University. At Rice he was appointed to the Elma W. Schneider Chair in Psychology and served as Dean of Social Sciences. At Brown he served as Provost, and also Acting President and as a Fellow (trustee) of the Brown Corporation, in addition to serving as Chair of the Board of Directors of the Brown University Research Foundation and as Vice President of the national Annenberg Institute for School Reform. He is a Fellow of American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, and the Society of Experimental Psychologists. Pomerantz has served as President on the Board of the FABBS Foundation (Federation of Associations of Behavioral and Brain Sciences), a Washington DC-based non-profit organization serving the behavioral, psychological, cognitive, and brain sciences. Locally he served as President of Disability 101, a Houston, Texas-based non-profit serving individuals with disabling chronic disease.

Mary Potter

MIT

Mary C. Potter is a professor of Psychology in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Science at MIT. She got her B.A. from Swarthmore College in 1952 and her Ph.D. from Harvard in 1961. She has served on the Board of the Psychonomic Society, becoming Chair in 1991. She was Chair of the Faculty at MIT in 1985-87. She was on the Executive Committee of Attention and Performance, 1994-2002. She is a Fellow of the APA and APS, and a member of the Society of Experimental Psychologists.Her research interests are in high-level visual perception, attention, and memory, as well as psycholinguistics and picture comprehension. She is particularly interested in processes that occur in the first second or two after a stimulus has been presented, a period when conceptual short termmemory (CSTM) permits high-level comprehension.

Jennifer Trueblood

University of California, Irvine

Jennifer Trueblood is an Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science at the University of California, Irvine. Her research takes a joint experimental and computational modeling approach to study human judgment, decision-making, reasoning, and memory. Jennifer's work examines how people make decisions when faced with multiple-alternatives and in changing environments. She is also interested in how people reason about causal events and how different perspectives, contexts, and frames can lead to interference effects in decision-making and memory. She is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Mathematical Psychology and is one of the organizers of the Women of Mathematical Psychology group.

Virginia Valian

Hunter

Virginia Valian is Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Linguistics at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She works in two domains: first and second language acquisition and gender equity. In language acquisition she studies syntactic competence and performance, using a variety of methods and investigating a range of languages (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/littlelinguist). She is currently particularly interested in logical arguments and empirical evidence concerning innateness and in mechanisms of acquisition. In gender equity she studies the reasons behind women's slow advancement in the professions and proposes remedies for individuals and institutions (http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/gendertutorial; http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/genderequity). She is currently particularly interested in cross-national differences and similarities in gender equity and in what determines who receives awards and prizes.

Tessa Warren

University of Pittsburgh

Dr. Warren's research focuses on how we understand sentences. She has addressed questions ranging from: how do cognition and working memory constrain comprehension, to: how does sentence comprehension influence eye movements during reading, to: what kinds of knowledge support our understanding of sentences. Her work has investigated sentence comprehension in younger and older adults using their native language, young adults learning a second language, and people with aphasia.